Welcome to my Blog

Either accidentally or knowingly you’ve stumbled on my blog Pat’s Pints.  The posts here are written for ordinary folks who enjoy good beer.  Some of the information may be practical if you want to learn more about beer, or make good choices when buying or drinking beers.  Some of it is likely to be of no use whatsoever, but if you are the kind of person who draws up brackets and seedings for a 16-beer single elimination IPA taste test, you might just enjoy what you read.

I live in Columbus, Ohio and so there will be some content that is specific to the beer scene in Central Ohio.  My love of good beer started when I was a graduate student at Oregon State University, so I have a soft spot for beers from the Pacific Northwest as well.

The posts are sorted into nine categories.  To access the posts click on one of the menu items below the picture at the top of this page. That will take you to another page with a list of all of the posts in that particularly category (i.e. Beer 101 – Learn More about Beer, Beer Reviews, Beer Flights, …).   Have a read and leave some comments.  If you actually like what you see consider signing up to follow the blog (use the follow link on the right hand side of this page).  If there is a topic you’d like me to address, or a beer you’d like me to review, just drop me a line or leave a request as a comment.  If you want to contact me send an e-mail to woodward.55@osu.edu.

Cheers

Pat

79 thoughts on “Welcome to my Blog

Add yours

  1. Took your suggestion and am enjoying the Troeg Nugget Nectar. The reviewers that suggest “blood orange and tangerine hop flavors” are right on. Nice find, all the more precious if it has a short half-life on the shelf.

    1. It’s one of my favorite beers. I’ll have to look for the orange/tangerine flavors when I review it this week. The clerk where I bought it (Kenny Road Market) said there may or may not be a second shipment, but there is a chance that when the beer on the shelves now runs out that will be it for the year.

      1. I have an idea how to do it. I’ll see if I can implement it this week. In the meantime there are two limited releases on Friday, Feb 21. Chillwave by Great Lakes, a double IPA that I really enjoyed last year (when it was called Alchemy Hour) and Hop Ju Ju by Fat Heads, another double IPA that won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival this year. I’ve head that the latter will be very limited and might be hard to come by.

  2. Tried the Four String Big Star White IPA tonight. Not the wow-factor of the White Rajah, but surprisingly nice. Very floral. Worth a tasting. I didn’t see it in your IPA showdown.

  3. Enjoying “Ellie’s Brown Ale” from Avery Brewing. Brown Ale’s are crowd pleasing, easy to drink, and this is no exception. It would be an (enjoyable) challenge to taste and analyze brown ales. There is enough substance to provoke interest, but it requires attention and careful analysis. Doesn’t hit you over the head. Working through a selection would be worthwhile.

    1. Brown Ale’s would be good. There are not a ton of them, so it would probably be practical to sample the field. Jackie O’s brewery down in Athens makes one that comes in a can. I’ve not tried it but most of their beers are good.

  4. Inspired by the Quadrophenia demos, I moved on to the Tommy demos; more raw, different, and interesting. Perhaps inspiration for a Tommyknocker Brewery tasting? Could match their line-up with another brewery. It would be nice if the other brewery also had a built-in soundtrack.
    Your challenge…find another brewery with a rock-album tie-in worth listening to.

    1. Dogfish Head does do an occasional line of music inspired beers: American Beauty (Grateful Dead), Hellhound on my Ale (Robert Johnson), and Bitches Brew (Miles Davis). We might have more luck with a beer vs beer contest rather than brewery vs brewery.

    1. Its not unique to Guinness or dark beers in general to use N2 instead of CO2. Anytime you see something on “nitro” that means nitrogen instead of carbon dioxide. It gives the beer a creamier mouthfeel. It’s most common for stouts and porters though. I’d say it makes a significant difference.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: